Oct 232013
 
DSC_4704

Nikon D3S, Nikon 105mm Macro, A:4, S:1/100, ISO:320

Animal behind a cage is annoying, but guess what, you need not to worry, with proper technique and camera setting, the cages (Bars) can rarely be noticed (see above photo). This what you need to do:

  • You need a long focal length lens, I would say anything between 70mm and above
  • Set your camera to APERTURE priority Mode (A) and Set it to the widest Aperture value, I would say something in the range of 3.5 Aperture and below
  • Get as close as possible to the cage
  • And take the photo

You will notice, because of the longer focal length of the lens and due to also the widest aperture, the CAGE (BARS) is barely visible in the photo. This way, it doesn’t even look as if the Animal was inside the cage, as far as you are concern, you took the photo at a wild safari trip somewhere. Below is another example of a Photo of Animal behind the cage that I have taken, as you can see barely  signs of BARS

palawan_binturong

Nikon D3S, Nikon 70-200mm, A:2.8, S:1/320, ISO:640

 

Hope you like this tip, let me know what you think and if you have any question let me know below.

 

  13 Responses to “How to Take photos of an Animal in a Zoo behind a Cage”

  1. Very impressive masha’ALLAH, you would have never thought these were taken in a zoo and behind bars as well!

  2. Thank you Salim for the useful tips.

  3. Ah, I hate zoos. I feel they are prisons for animals. Okay, stepping off my soapbox, JAK for this tip. I definitely can use it.

  4. thank you salim , i will try to take a pic like this 🙂

  5. Recently i have been to Barka zoo…and i faced difficulty with 18-55 lens…and with 2much of crowd…my camera gave importance to the cage and the animal looked faint….i took few good snaps out of great difficulty….i have one more lens which is 75-300, but when i fix it some slight shake is there due to its heavyness….what shall i do? Thanks for your great idea and tips….i will try this next time….

    • Mali,

      As a Rule of thumb. You need your shutter speed to be not less of that of your Lens focal Length. Meaning if you are using 300mm lens, than make sure your shutter speed is 1/300 and more. Otherwise anything less it would shake. Hope that clarify your issue

  6. Thank you very much Salim, let me try with that…

  7. Salim, very useful and thought -provoking tip for me. I remember having taken some animals behind a cage long ago when I was only using Auto mode and one could see the bars along with the animal clearly which spoilt the picture. Now things are clearer. Thank you.

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